On this weeks reflection…

for my African-American Studies class, #BLM in media and politics,

After our Tuesday discussion, still pondering on color-blindness and black-on-black crime, I was perplexed by the attentions to race. Color-blindness suggest the notion: we live in a homogeneous society, where, “you judge someone— not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” Individual believers suggest they disregard race when engaging with people of color. An example is the segment of The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, starring Tomi Lahren, Lahren said, “I’ve never looked down on someone because of their skin color.” Linking the greatest golf player Tiger Woods, not to his African and Asian descent, but to his persistence and passion, is another example. This facade is dangerous to how it portrays social injustice in history, politics, and economics.

And, there is black-on-black crime, a notion that more black people die at the hands of black individuals, than from police. Saying, it is a prevalent issue among black communities, cultures, and essentially black society. Opponents of #BLM use this to downplay the significance of police brutality, and shift our attention towards black-on-black crime. To comprehend this concept, you must understand race—what is BLACK? Elizabeth addressed on this topic in class. We have this mental encyclopedia of blackness. Attention to race is made. This is the fallacy I noticed between color-blindness and black-on-black crime. One concept takes heed to disregard racial stereotypes, while the other makes use of racial stereotypes. “Colorblindness” and “black on black” crime is gibberish, to say the least.

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